New and Expectant Mothers at Work - Training

This comprehensive online New and Expectant Mothers training programme provides both employers and employees with everything they need to know about returning to work post pregnancy and considerations for expectant mothers.

Key Features & Benefits of this Course

  • Complete this online course in just 65 minutes
  • CPD approved
  • Suitable for employers, employees, expectant mothers and new mothers
  • Work towards current legislation
  • Suitable for all industries
  • End of course test and printable certificate
  • Bulk discounts, free trails and demos available
  • Condensed versions of this course are also available

New and Expectant Mothers at Work - Training Course Contents

1. Risk Assessments for New & Expectant Mothers

In this section we look at the two stages of risk assessment which should be done. Firstly a generic risk assessment – which is done for all employees, but must cover new and expectant mothers, regardless of whether an organisation has any. And the second stage of risk assessment - assessment after notification, which is all about re-visiting the generic risk assessment after a woman has notified her manager that she’s pregnant.

2. Workplace Risks

This section concentrates on the four main areas which must be considered in a risk assessment to take account of new and expectant mothers – physical factors – including manual handling and seating, biological hazards – for example illnesses and bacteria, chemical hazards, such as working with lead or mercury; and working conditions – which includes working hours, travelling and work environment.

3. Equality and Employment Law

This section covers maternity rights, such as maternity leave, maternity pay and maternity allowance. It looks at redundancy, paternity leave, adoption, surrogacy arrangements and returning to work. It refers to the Equality Act in connection with discrimination.

The 10 most common workplace maternity discrimination examples are as follows:

  • Singling out pregnant employees for redundancy
  • Mishandling requests for flexible working on return from maternity leave
  • Inappropriate comments
  • Health and Safety breaches
  • Penalising a woman who is sick during her pregnancy
  • Failure to communicate with an employee on maternity leave
  • Failure to pay an employee on maternity leave
  • Failure to allow a woman to return to work after pregnancy
  • Disadvantaging a new mother in relation to training and equipment
  • Basing recruitment decisions on an employees family situation

 Test & Certificate

This New and Expectant Mothers at Work - Training course concludes with a 20 question multiple choice test with printable certificate. In addition, brief in-course questionnaires guide the user through the sections of the training, and are designed to reinforce learning and ensure maximum user engagement throughout. As well as printable user certificates, training progress and results are all stored centrally in your LMS (Learning Management System) and can be accessed any time to re-print certificates, check and set pass marks and act as proof of a commitment to ongoing legal compliance.

 Legislation

The Maternity and Parental Leave Regulations 1999

The Maternity and Parental Leave Regulations came into force on the 15th of December, 1999. This legislation makes it clear that expectant parents are legally entitled to parental leave and provides more information on: 

  • Unfair dismissals
  • Extent of entitlement
  • Protection from detriment and discrimination
  • Pay
  • Contractual rights

(1) An employee is entitled to ordinary maternity leave provided that she satisfies the following conditions—

(a) At least 21 days before the date on which she intends her ordinary maternity leave period to start, or, if that is not reasonably practicable, as soon as is reasonably practicable, she notifies her employer of—

(i) Her pregnancy;

(ii) The expected week of childbirth, and

(iii) The date on which she intends her ordinary maternity leave period to start,

and
(b) If requested to do so by her employer, she produces for his inspection a certificate from—

(i) A registered medical practitioner, or

(ii) A registered midwife,

stating the expected week of childbirth.

The Maternity and Parental Leave Regulations 1999

 Reviews More reviews

Easy to follow.

5
By on May 1, 2017
Included all the information required in an easy to follow format.

Easy to follow programme

5
By on September 20, 2016
Very interesting and useful knowledge. A learnt a lot of things that I was unaware about!

well informed infomation

5
By on September 2, 2016
excellent up dated infomation as always.